Independent Living or Community Care?

ilfcare1
 





The Body Bag

I'm in the body bag, it's just that
I'm not dead yet.
I was placed in the body bag,
with life hardly started
and each person I met
pulled
the zip a little higher,
pulled
the ties a little tighter,
with their
'what a shame'
'how terrible.'
I lie here and the doctor seals my fate
and a relative seals my fate
and a neighbor seals my fate
and a stranger seals my fate
until I'm
covered
completely
sealed.



 
 

Like a ride at Alton Towers, they pay for the pity ride. Handing over the money, they demand full value in the pity stakes. They feel free to judge, to condemn the others' life and expect their judging, their pitying, will be applauded, will be welcomed.

From childhood I've had my life judged and condemned as being pointless, as if, when I found myself having a disease, I fell into my own grave, my own death. Whatever pityers say to justify this judging, explaining other meanings, it's destroying judgment of our lives, damaging abuse when it's directed at children, putting our whole lives in jeopardy.

For ME to be angry about my life or, on occasions, say, 'it's terrible' or 'I hate the pain,' that's part of MY life process. When non-disabled pityers do the same, about mine or anybody else's life, that's judging from ignorance and inexperience. It's a sign of the inadequacy of non-disabled people, who are too afraid to occupy heir own bodies, their own lives and tackle the problems they find there. So, to indulge and distract themselves, they make free with our dignity, our lives, throwing their pity around - their, 'how terrible' and 'what a shame.'
We need STATUTORY (HUMAN) RIGHTS, then we won't have to pay for poverty resources with condemned lives, disabled by futility.
 

 

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